AppCheck Security Blog

AppCheck & the OWASP Penetration Testing Checklist

The OWASP Penetration Testing Checklist is aimed at delivering a baseline standard against which potential vendor solutions can be assessed to ensure that a prospective web application security testing provider delivers a service that is sufficient

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AppCheck & the OWASP Penetration Testing Checklist

The OWASP Penetration Testing Checklist is aimed at delivering a baseline standard against which potential vendor solutions can be assessed to ensure that a prospective web application security testing provider delivers a service that is sufficient

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Umbraco Forms File Upload Vulnerability: Technical Analysis (CVE-2021-37334)

On the 15th of July 2021 Umbraco and AppCheck released a Security Advisory to alert users of a vulnerability within the Umbraco Forms component that could be exploited to gain remote code execution on the affected system.

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AppCheck & The OWASP Top 10 Privacy Risks

The OWASP Top 10 Privacy Risks list is an attempt to curate a completely neutral set of prioritised privacy risks for businesses to consider, as well as a recommended set of countermeasures for businesses to deploy against the occurrence of those risks.

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When Encryption Goes Bad

Customers new to the AppCheck platform can often be surprised at the number of vulnerabilities that AppCheck highlights relating to transport encryption offered on their services – unencrypted (plaintext) services, web applications with vulnerable cipher suites, encryption libraries containing exploitable flaws, registration forms that email users passwords in clear text. The list of checks that AppCheck performs is extensive, and on a website that has not previously been covered by regular vulnerability scanning, the extent of encryption issues can be surprising

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URGENT Security Advisory: Umbraco Forms RCE patch releases 20th July at 7am UTC

Security Issue:

Researchers at AppCheck have discovered a security issue within Umbraco Forms which could lead to a remote code execution attack and/or arbitrary file deletion. Umbraco are advising everyone be ready for a fix which is to be released 20th July at 7am UTC.

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HTTP Verbs & Their Security Risks

In this article we’ll take a look into what HTTP “verbs” or methods are, how each varies and works, and what the potential security risks are that should be considered with each. We’ll also see how vulnerability scanners such as AppCheck can automatically check for many of the potential vulnerabilities presented by webservers making use of these methods.

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Attacking the Supply Chain: Dependency Confusion

Modern web applications are typically built using a combination of in-house custom code and third-party libraries. The in-house code leverages functionality from typically open-source libraries that provide convenient access in the chosen development language to common functions (such as email sending or data structure access). These libraries will typically be deployed to the webserver serving the web application along with the in-house code... [read more]

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“RCE” Primer: Remote Code Execution

Remote code execution (RCE) is the term used to describe the execution of arbitrary code on a system where the attacker does not have direct access to the console. Any vulnerability that allows an attacker to execute code or commands on remote system where this was not intended can be said to result in RCE.

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Advisory: CVE-2020-29045 - Unauthenticated RCE via Arbitrary Object Deserialisation in Five Star Restaurant Menu - WordPress Ordering Plugin

It is possible to gain Unauthenticated Remote Code Execution (RCE) on any WordPress instance that is using this plugin, due to the unsafe use of unserialize for the parsing of unsanitised user input, via the cookie fdm_cart used within includes/class-cart-manager.php

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Information Disclosure Vulnerabilities: Mimes, Gits & Leaky Proxies

Information disclosure occurs when out-of-scope data – such as information relating to the service operation, or its operators – is returned to clients in-band through the defined data response channel (e.g HTTP responses). Typically exploiting these vulnerabilities doesn’t require an attacker to do anything other than make passive requests (those not containing a malicious payloads) or to attempt to bypass access controls – often there is therefore no “attack signature” that can be detected in logs or blocked by Web Application Firewalls, and companies may find it impossible to prosecute an attacker or prove that they performed an action that was in any way criminal.

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